Pin Welder Repair Guidelines

MIDWEST Fasteners offers a full Pin- and Stud-Welder Repair service through our Manufacturing Plant in Ohio.

We are often asked “how to” best make use of the service.

Here are some suggestions to assist all parties:

Packaging & Shipping
          -include ALL parts and components of system, if possible
          –disconnect ALL cables prior to packing  & shipping
          –properly pack components to prevent shipping damage
          -do not ship without identification and contact information
Information
          -include Contact information
          -include Service needs or Problem descriptions…some information as to Why in              need of Service
          -repairs less than $100 will be performed, unless ‘estimate required’ is noted.
          -overly worn, non-serviceable accessories will be replaced as part of repairs.
Warranty
          -warranties are per MIDWEST warranty statement by Model, by Item
          -warranty commences upon original shipment of Model from manufacturing
          -warranty coverage is for failure of Parts or for manufacturing Labor
          -Fuses are not covered by Warranty unless part of additional Parts failure


Repair shipments to:
Midwest Fasteners Inc
ATTN: Welder Repair
450 Richard St.
Miamisburg, OH 45342

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How to Install Weld Pins and Weld Studs

Transcript:

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that getting work done quickly and reliably is really important to most jobs, and we can help with that using Capacitor Discharge Stud Welding.

Easy to operate, portable stud-welding can be used to install many types of fasteners.

These include Weld Pins or Weld Studs, and can be applied using Capacitor Discharge stud welding. A process often called “CD” welding for short.

CD Fasteners can be stud-welded, saving money by doing the fastening work quickly and with reliability.

Installing Fasteners with “C.D.” welding is very portable and uses readily-available electric power from an everyday, one-hundred-and-ten-volt power outlet.

In addition to being portable, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple components
  • they work quickly
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to apply Welded Fasteners using the capacitor discharge method.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 instant steps:

  • Contact.
  • Ignition.
  • Placement of the Stud or Pin
  • and, “Completion” of the Pin Weld

We can use a standard MIDWEST Portable C.D. system to install Weld Pins, here are the component parts of the C.D. System.

  • a Controller [or Power Unit] which is plugged into a one-hundred-ten-volt power outlet to provide weld power and control.
  • a ‘CD’ Gun with Cables, which delivers the welding-grade power and holds the fastener properly during welding.
  • a ground cable and clamping connection which is attached to the work surface to provide the rest of “the circuit” to our weld set up.
  • and finally, special Accessories are needed to fit the Pin to the Weld Gun.

These parts make up the CD system and we are ready to install using Weld Pins using CD Stud Welding.

The Gun is prepared with the chucking accessory know as a “Collet” for this type fastener. Weld pins, properly sized and of the proper type, are held in the gun prior to welding by the Collet. Likewise, the “Foot” on the end of the gun is properly adjusted.

The gun-mounted pin in the Collet makes contact with the metal surface to be insulated, and the operator places the gun flat and flush onto the surface.

With pressure applied to remain rigid and stable, the installer triggers the Pin Gun, and the CD process completes the weld just that quickly.

The equipment now recovers instantly as you break contact with the welded pin, and is ready for the next weld.

The welded pin shows NO backside distortion or “BURN-through” with the weld providing good strength from the bond. The Strength of the C.D. weld is strong enough to fail in the fastener “before” it fails in the weld when applied properly, ultimately giving us superior strength for holding material in place.

Since the CD process can deliver 15-20 welds per minute, material is installed quickly and positively.

One-hundred-and-ten-volt “CD” systems can weld as quickly as you:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • and Shoot

The finished C.D. Weld has the advantages of Capacitor Discharge welding:

  • simple operation with no special power hook ups
  • no special welding enclosures
  • and no weld masks or special welding clothing required

And with that you get fast welded results on lots of fasteners, placed reliably one-after-another, all with good holding power to support material of all types.

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welding is fast, reliable, and gives superior weld strength on weld pins, on weld studs, and on many types of fasteners.

For more information on Weld Pins and CD Stud Welding, please visit our leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

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How to Test Weld Pins, Weld Studs and Cuphead Weld Pins

Transcript:

Portable stud-welding is easy to operate and can be used to install many types of fasteners, including things like Weld Pins, Weld Studs and Cuphead (or “mini-Cup”) Insulation Pins.

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that getting work done fast and with reliability is really important to most jobs, and we have ways to help with that. The fast and practical application of Capacitor Discharge StudWelding.

A process often called “CD” welding for short.

Installing Fasteners with “C.D.” welding can be very portable and uses “everyday”, one-hundred-and-ten-volt power.

In addition ease-of-use, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple parts
  • work quickly
  • and can be used on thin metals to apply a range of Fasteners.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 rapid steps:

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Fastener
  • and “Completion” of the Weld.

Looking at a standard MIDWEST Portable C.D. welder, here are the components of the weld system.

  • a Power Unit, which is plugged into the source for one-hundred-and-ten-volt power
  • a CD Gun with Cables
  • a ground cable and clamping connection
  • and finally, Gun Accessories to fit the fastener to the Gun.

These parts make up the CD system and we are ready to install parts using C.D. Stud-Welding. With the Gun prepared for the fastener to be welded, the Fastener is held in the gun and everything is properly adjusted. The fastener makes contact with the surface to be welded, as the operator locates the weld gun flat to the surface.

Pressure is applied, the CD Gun is triggered, and just that quickly, the CD equipment completes the weld.

The welded part shows NO backside distortion or “BURN-through” and the weld will provide good strength under pressure.

The Strength of the C.D. weld is strong enough to fail in the fastener “before” it fails in the weld, when properly applied. Ultimately, giving us superior strength for holding firmly in place on many types of applications and uses.

Since the CD process can deliver 15-20 welds per minute, material is installed quickly and positively.

One-hundred-and-ten-volt systems can weld as quickly as you load, contact, and weld.

Using the same type set up and steps we can also apply Stud-sized fasteners just as quickly and reliably.

Testing again shows the Strength of the C.D. weld, which is strong enough to fail in the fastener “before” it fails in the weld.

On very light gauge materials, the base of the stud will actually “pull out” of the material, maintaining the weld under stress, rather than show failure in the fastener. In this case the weld is maintained, but base material is not sufficient to support the load, therefore the base metal shows the failure.

But, the C.D. studweld still “Holds”.

Improperly welded parts can be “read” to evaluate problems with application.

As we saw earlier, a PROPERLY welded C.D. part will fail in the fastener, before failing in the weld. That weld also illustrates proper burn-in and weld appearance. Notice the weld has 360-degrees of melted material at the base.

This melting is consistent, tends to ‘adhere’ to the base diameter of the stud, and is not “splashing out” away from the stud base.

A COLD weld looks different and will fail because of too little heat or too little “time” in the weld cycle.

Notice in this sample of a Cold weld, that there is little or NO melted material around the base of the welded stud. Also the stud, or pin, can appear to be “sitting up” on the material and NOT illustrate good bonding “into” the base metal after the weld cycle.

Looking at the failed part, we see a silver, “soldery” appearance and sometimes even “remains of the weld tip” which was not fully ignited.

In this case heat or time needs to be adjusted to work together. We see this most often at Midwest Fasteners, when proper accessories are “not used” or when the accessories are “not used properly” in the set-up o the weld gun .

HOT Capacitor Discharge welds are also easy to spot.

With too much heat or too little weld time, there is a noticeable SPLASH of the weld material away from the stud base. In some cases there is so much splash, that there is just not enough metal to “weld to” as the studweld is made.

A failed HOT part like this also shows a violent, burnout during the weld cycle, giving it the name “HOT weld”.

Again, heat or time needs to be adjusted to work together.

Again we see this from Midwest Fasteners, when proper accessories are “not used” or “not used properly” in weld gun setup AND especially when the C.D. Welder is turned up too high in it’s voltage setting to “solve” weld quality problems—be sure to consult your Owner’s manual, or equipment markings, for proper settings for the diameter and type of part to be welded.

Cuphead or mini-Cup welding is quite different due to the Pin-Welding process for installations of this type.

The welded Cuphead is designed to provide “support” or Pull-Away strength—-strength sufficient to hold material in place.

To test this, pull from under the washer-head of the welded Cuphead. Pulling straight-away from the base tests the weld strength. Properly welded cupheads should withstand this test and feel ‘strong’ in the bond to the base metal.

Cupheads are NOT designed to provide anything more than support strength and will NOT ordinarily show side-to-side, or ‘shear’, strength.

For more on Cuphead welding and how to install and test cupheads, see Midwest Fasteners video “How to Install Cupheads

AND for more information on Weld Pins, CD Stud Welding, and Midwest Fasteners;

Please visit our leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

Posted in The Insulation Industry, Videos, Welding | Leave a comment

How to Set Up C.D. Weld Studs

Transcript:

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that portable stud welding can be used to install many types of fasteners quickly and with strength for practical use in everyday applications. Setting up for stud-welding is a simple process.

Weld Studs, sometimes called “Stud Welded Fasteners”, can be welded using Capacitor Discharge stud welding or “C.D.” for short. This is a portable welding process which uses readily-available electric power from an everyday, one-hundred-and-ten-volt power outlet.

In addition to being portable, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple components,
  • work quickly,
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to apply Studs and a variety of Welded Fasteners using the capacitor discharge process

Using Capacitor Discharge for Stud Welding offers a high strength weld, both quickly and reliably.

It can be used with Stainless & Mild Steel — even coated and Galvanized materials— plus Aluminum; with no burn-through of the metal, AND no special weld set-ups required.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 fast steps:

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Stud
  • and “Completion” of the Pin Weld

The standard, portable CD system consists of:

  • The Controller [ or Power Unit] which is plugged into the one-hundred-and-ten-volt power outlet.
  • The CD Gun with Cables which is used to command the power unit and deliver weld current with the Gun also serving as the Stud holder to properly place the fastener during welding.
  • Then, on the other side of “the circuit”, a ground cable and clamp is attached to the work-surface to complete our weld connections.
  • Finally, special Accessories are used to hold the Stud in the Gun.

These parts make up the CD weld system.

It is critical to set the gun up properly, to allow these steps and components to go into action and to allow CD Studs to weld reliably.  There are several ways to set up for stud welding with the MIDWEST CD portable.

First, a simple assembly called,”B” Collet and “B” Stop.

To install these accessories as an assembly, prepare the C.D. Gun, by loosening the screws at the end of the gun-shaft to accept the parts. At the same time, loosen the set screw on each gun leg.

Before installing the Collet, make sure the Collet is the proper size for the stud diameter to be welded. Next, insert a proper length “Stop” into the back of the Collet.

Proper sizing means the Stud will protrude past the end of the Collet, but still be held tight and rigidly during welding.

NEVER allow the head of the stud, or what is call the “Flange” to come in contact with the Collet during welding action.

Insert the Collet and Stop Assembly into the Gun until it “seats” and stops fully.

Next, tighten the set screws, in this case 2 of them, and check to see that the Gun is free and clear to operate smoothly during the weld.

With the Collet installed, insert a Stud fully into the Collet until it stops. Slide the Leg and Foot Assembly until you have only an eighth-of-an-inch of Stud sticking out past the foot. This is called “proper protrusion” and is critical to allow the Welder, Stud and Capacitor Discharge Welding Process to perform properly.

Once the eighth-inch is set, tighten both set screws to keep the foot steady.

If your job requires different length Studs to be used from time-to-time, make this adjustment to each Stud length to be welded, always ending with the critical eighth-inch of protrusion.

That completes set up of The Collet with Stop and you are ready to weld. Just:

  • load
  • contact
  • and weld

And finally where Stud placement requires C.D. welding to place long fasteners, the MIDWEST C.D. gun and it’s special design, can accept another set of accessories to accommodate these jobs with what is called an “Internal Stop”.

Removing the rear cap from the MIDWEST C.D. gun exposes the back side of the gun shaft.

Made with internal threading, this type shaft will accept a “stop-holder” and a “stop”.

Size the stop to accommodate the longer Studs to be used. (For extra assistance with stop sizing and length consult the MIDWEST Equipment manuals, accessory parts lists, or your MIDWEST Distributor.)

With the stop mounted in the “Holder”, install this assembly into the shaft and replace the Gun’s Main Spring & Rear Cap.

Now install a “B” Collet just like before, with NO stop this time; allowing the stud to pass down-into the gun. The fastener will be held in place at a set stopping-point by the internal-stop and set-up can proceed with adjustment of the foot and legs, which is one-eighth inch protrusion and welding as previously shown.

With any of the MIDWEST Gun accessories shown you can get fast welded results with the C.D. stud welding process.

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welders can cycle for 15-20 welds per minute, and material can be installed quickly and cleanly, using only one-hundred-and-ten-volt power, with reliably welded fasteners, one-after-another, and all with good holding-power to support materials of all types.

For more information on Weld Studs and CD Stud Welding, please visit our industry leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

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How to Set Up C.D. Weld Pins

Transcript:

To get work done quickly and reliably is really important on today’s jobs. At Midwest Fasteners, we know that easy to use portable stud welding can be helpful to install all types of fasteners in a fast and practical way. And we know that Midwest Fasteners can help.

Weld Pins, sometimes called “Weld Nails”, can be welded using Capacitor Discharge stud welding, a process that is often called “CD” welding for short.

This is a portable welding process which uses readily-available electric power from an everyday, one-hundred-and-ten-volt power outlet.

In addition to being portable, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple components
  • work quickly
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to apply a variety of Welded Fasteners using capacitor discharge welding

Using the CD process for Pin welding offers a strong weld quickly and reliably to impale insulating materials. It can be used with Stainless & Mild Steel, even coated and Galvanized materials, plus Aluminum; with no burn-through of the metal, and no special welding setup.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 fast steps:

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Pin and
  • “Completion” of the Weld

The standard, portable CD system consists of:

  • The Controller [ or Power Unit] which is plugged into the one-hundred-and-ten-volt outlet.
  • The CD Gun with Cables is used to command the power unit and deliver weld current, with the Gun also serving as the Pin holder to properly place the pin during welding.
  • Then, on the other side of “the circuit” a ground cable and clamping connection is attached to the work-surface to complete our Capacitor Discharge connections.
  • And finally, special Accessories are used to hold the Pin in the Gun.

 

These parts make up the CD weld system.

It is critical to set the gun up properly to allow these steps and components to go into action, and to allow pins to weld reliably. There are several ways to set up for Pin-welding with the MIDWEST CD portable pin welder.

First, the simple part called the “Bullet” Collet .

This type Collet requires no additional parts and can be used on Pins up to 4” long.

To install this accessory, prepare the C.D. Gun, by loosening the screws at the end of the gun shaft to accept the Collet. At the same time, loosen the set screw on each gun leg.

Before installing the Collet, make sure the Collet is the proper size for the pin and diameter to be welded.

Insert the Bullet-collet into the Gun until it “seats” and stops fully.

Next, tighten the set screws (in this case 2 of them) and check to see that the Gun is free and clear to operate smoothly during the weld.

With the Collet installed, insert a Weld pin fully into the Collet until it stops. Slide the Leg and Foot Assembly until you have only an eighth-of-an-inch of pin sticking out past the foot. This is called “proper protrusion” and is critical to allow the Welder, Pin and Capacitor Discharge Welding Process to perform properly.

Once the eighth-inch is set, tighten both set screws to keep the foot steady.

If your job requires different length pins to be used, make this adjustment to each pin length to be welded, always ending with the critical eighth-inch of protrusion.

That completes set up of The Bullet Collet and you are ready to weld. Just:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • and Apply

Use of the standard “B” Collet and “B” Stop are similar and can be used for lots of applications as another accessory option. Installation of these accessories occurs as before, as does the final C.D. Gun set up.

Prepare the C.D. Gun the same way, by loosening the screws at the end of the gun shaft, and also on the underside of the gun faceplate.

Remember again, to make sure your accessories are the proper size for the pin and diameter to be welded.

This time, first insert a proper length “Stop” Into the Collet. Then put this assembly into the Gun until it “seats” and stops fully.

Next, tighten the set screws and check to see that the Gun is free and clear to operate.

Now, with the Collet & Stop installed, insert a pin into the Collet, again fully, until it stops. Slide the Legs and Foot until you have the eighth-of-an-inch of pin sticking out assuring proper protrusion and weld timing. Once the eighth-inch is set, tighten both set screws to keep the foot firm during welding.

Again, if your job requires different length pins to be used make this adjustment to each pin length to be welded—always ending with the proper eighth-inch of protrusion.

Welding is simple:

  • load
  • contact
  • and Weld

For an easy setup that requires fewer Collets in the long run, many users prefer a “Collet Protector”. This option gives longer Collet life and allows many length pins to be welded from the same setup; it also prevents “TOO MUCH” pin stick-out, a condition that can cause problems on pin jobs requiring lengths of 6 inches and longer.

Installing accessory parts in this way is also simple. With the gun prepared for accessories, install a Collet (properly sized for pin and diameter) into the gun shaft and tighten it down.

[NOTE: we are using NO stop or other accessory inside the Collet or C.D. Gun]

Next, install a Collet Protector Assembly “over” the Collet. The Collet Protector should also be properly sized to your pin diameter. Tighten it down by the set screws which are part of the Collet Protector Body.

With these parts in place, make the protrusion adjustment until one-eighth inch of pin shows past the “Foot” again, and tighten down the leg screws.

If there is NO change in the pin diameter, then no change needs to be made in your Gun or Accessory setup. With the Collet Protector in use, any length pin is now exposed with proper protrusion at the weld end.

Also Collet life is prolonged versus use of the standard B Collet because it is “protected” from the weld, as well as protected from damage in pull-away or in use.

The design of the MIDWEST C.D. gun allows long pins to protrude through the gun as far as needed, thus preserving the timing-tip exposure which we have set at the weld head of the Pin. Loading and welding goes smoothly, even with different length pins.

And finally, where placement requires Pin-welding to operate in a recess, or where extra “stick out” is needed to get the fastener “TO” the work surface; the MIDWEST C.D. gun and it’s special design, can accept another set of accessories to set-up these jobs with what is called an “Internal Stop”.

Removing the rear-cap from the MIDWEST C.D. Gun exposes the back side of the gun shaft. Made with internal threading, this shaft will accept a “stop-holder” and a “stop”.

Size the stop to accommodate the long pin to be used. (For extra assistance consult the MIDWEST Equipment manuals, accessory parts lists, or your MIDWEST Distributor.)

With the stop mounted in the “Holder”, install this assembly into the shaft and replace the Gun’s Main Spring & Rear Cap.

Now install a “B” Collet just like before, with NO stop; allowing the pin to pass down-into the gun.

The fastener will be stopped at a set point by the internal stop and set-up can proceed with adjustment of the foot-and-legs, one-eighth inch protrusion and welding.

With any MIDWEST Gun accessories shown you can get fast welded results with the C.D. stud welding process.

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welders can cycle for 15-20 welds per minute, and material can be installed quickly and cleanly, using only one-hundred-and-ten-volt power, with reliably welded fasteners, one-after-another,and all with good holding-power to support materials of all types.

For more information on Pin Welding and CD Stud Welding, please visit our website at MidwestFasteners.com.

 

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How to Install Cuphead Weld Pins

Transcript:

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that getting work done quickly and reliably is really important these days, and We have a way to help with that. Easy to use, easy-to-install Cuphead Weld Pins.

It’s a fast and practical way to get jobs done less expensively, quickly and reliably.

Cuphead Weld Pins, sometimes called “Mini” Cups, can be applied using Capacitor Discharge stud welding, a process often called “CD” welding for short.

The Cuphead pin is used to erect-and-install insulating materials all in one pass saving money by doing the fastening work quickly, and with a reliable welded fastener.

Cuphead C.D. welding is a portable process which uses readily-available electric power from an everyday, one-hundred-and-ten-volt power outlet.

In addition to being portable, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple components
  • they work quickly
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to apply Cuphead Weld Pins and a variety of Welded Fasteners using the capacitor discharge method.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 instant steps:

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Stud or Pin
  • and, “Completion” of the Pin Weld

We’ll use a standard MIDWEST Portable C.D. system to install the Cuphead.

Here’s how to set up for proper installation of Cuphead Weld Pins.

Using the standard, portable CD system, we see it consists of:

  • a Controller [or Power Unit] which is plugged into one-hundred-and-ten-volt power.
  • the CD Gun with Cables which is used to control the power unit, to deliver weld current as it serves as the Pin holder, and also to place the pin properly during welding.
  • a ground cable and clamping connection which is attached to the work to provide the rest of “the circuit” to our weld system.

And finally, special Accessories to fit the “Pin” to the Gun. These parts make up the CD system and we are ready to install the Cuphead weld pin.

The Gun is prepared with a Magnetic Chuck as the accessory which is needed for this type fastener.

Cuphead pins, properly sized and of the proper type for the material, are held in contact with the gun prior to welding by the Magnetic chuck–either on the gun or pre-placed in the material.

In this case with insulation material in place, the gun-mounted pin first pierces the material, making contact with the metal surface to be insulated. Light pressure is applied to the gun by the installer, the trigger is pulled, and the CD process completes the weld just that quickly.

The equipment now recovers, instantly, as you break contact with the welded pin, and is ready for the next weld.

The Cuphead weld shows NO backside burn-through with the weld providing good strength from the bond.

The Strength of the cuphead weld is to provide support of material installed and to prevent pull-away of material once welded. To properly strength test a cuphead weld, pull away by exerting pressure from the underside of the welded fastener-head.

Since the CD process can deliver 15-20 welds per minute, material is installed quickly and cleanly.

C.D. Cuphead one-hundred-and-ten volt systems can weld as quickly as you:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • and Apply

When applying through FSK or “foil-faced” material, always use an “insulated” Cuphead…one with a paper-covering on the underside of the washer-head. This prevents arcing and burning of the foil face during welding.

Apply light pressure, about one-eighth of an inch of down-force, on the gun & gun spring during the entire welding cycle. This allows the burn-off process of the Cuphead CD weld to occur properly and creates the strongest weld bond possible.

Cuphead pin length should allow for this burn off, and many users DO prefer a Pin about one-eighth inch longer than the material to be installed.

Finally be sure to pull the gun away “after” the weld cycle is complete—many operators like to wait just a second-longer after the trigger pull to assure that the welding is complete before moving the gun.

Best results come if you do NOT pull-away during the weld, making sure the cycle is complete before re-loading.

The finished Cuphead weld shows the advantages of Capacitor Discharge welding; with NO backside distortion or burn-through. The weld provides good strength from the bond, and fastening is created in a short cycle which exhibits strength sufficient to support materials without falling down or pulling loose.

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welding is fast, reliable, and gives superior weld strength on Cuphead weld pins and many types of fasteners.

For more information on Cuphead and CD Stud Welding, please visit our industry leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

Posted in The Insulation Industry, Videos, Welding | Leave a comment

How to Set Up Cuphead Weld Pins

Transcript:

Getting work done quickly and reliably is really important these days. At Midwest Fasteners, we know that easy to use portable stud welding to install many kinds of fasteners is a fast and practical way to get jobs done. And we know that Midwest Fasteners can help.

Cuphead Weld Pins, sometimes called “Mini” Cups, can be applied using Capacitor Discharge stud welding. This process is often called “CD” welding for short.

It’s a portable welding process which uses readily-available electric power from an everyday, 110-volt outlet.

In addition to being portable, CD Welding Systems have:

  • simple components,
  • work quickly,
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to apply Cuphead Weld Pins and a variety of Welded Fasteners using this welding method.

Using the CD process for Cuphead welding offers a high strength weld very quickly and reliably, with minimum labor to install insulating materials. It can be used with Stainless & Mild Steel — even coated and Galvanized materials with no burn-through of the metal, and no special weld setups.

This type of pin welding is often used to insulate duct work and for application of ductlining insulation, especially when Insulation needs to be applied “remotely” or in-the-Field, on a jobsite.

The process of Capacitor Discharge welding occurs in a series of 4 instant steps:

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Stud or Pin
  • and, “Completion” of the Pin Weld

Here’s how to set up properly for Cuphead welding with the CD portable. The standard, portable CD system consists of:

  • A Controller [or Power Unit] which is plugged into a 110 volt power outlet.
  • The CD Gun and Cables which are used to control the power unit and deliver weld current. The Gun also serves as the Pin holder, plus places the pin properly during welding.
  • and, A ground cable and clamping connection which is attached to the work and provides the rest of “the circuit” to complete our Capacitor Discharge weld system.

Finally, special Accessories are used to fit the Pin to the Gun. For Cuphead Pin Welding the accessory is a Magnetic Chucking device.

These parts make up the CD system and we are ready to set up for Cupheads.

Prepare the CD Cuphead Gun, by loosening the screws at the end of the gun to accept the Magnetic Chuck.

Insert the Chuck fully into the Gun until it “seats” and stops.

Lastly, tighten the set screws (in this case 2 of them), and check to see that the Gun is free and clear to operate smoothly during the weld. All parts should be cleanly and tightly connected to assure proper welding of any fastener both at the weld end, through the gun and pin, plus at the ground point.

A finished Cuphead weld shows the advantages of Capacitor Discharge welding with NO backside distortion or burn-through. The weld provides good strength from the bond, and fastening is created in a short cycle which exhibits strength sufficient to support materials without falling down or pulling loose.

Since the CD process can deliver 15-20 welds per minute, material is installed quickly and cleanly.

C.D. one-hundred-and-ten volt systems can weld as quickly as you:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • and Apply

With that you get fast welded results on lots of fasteners, with pins placed reliably one-after-another, all with good holding power to support materials of all types.

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welding is fast, reliable, and gives superior weld strength on many types of fasteners.

For more information on Cuphead and CD Stud Welding, see our industry leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

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How to Set Up Capacitor Discharge Welding Systems

Transcript:

Capacitor Discharge, often called “CD” welding for short, is characterized by the use of everyday power from an ordinary one-hundred-and-ten volt electrical outlet. This process is part of a larger family of fastening methods known as Stud Welding, or “Pin” Welding.

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that saving time is crucial to all types of operations. And easy to use, portable studwelding can be used to install many varieties of fasteners.

Since equipment setup is critical to getting the job done properly, let’s take a look at how Midwest Fasteners can help.

CD Welding Systems use readily-available, everyday electricity, and this is only one of the things that makes them:

  • very portable
  • made up of simple, light-weight parts,
  • able to work in short, low-temperature, weld cycles,
  • and used on sheet metal thickness material to create high strength welded fasteners in lots of types.

From this we get strength, speed and reliability by a simple process.

Capacitor Discharge studwelding occurs in 4 instant steps.

  •  Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Stud (or ‘closing the Gap’)
  • and, “Bonding” of the Weld

For a closer look at setting up the C.D. stud, or pin, “welder” we’ll use a standard portable Midwest Fasteners Capacitor Discharge system.

First, the main unit is called the power unit, or “Controller”. It connects to one-hundred-and-volt or “wall power”. Some units have detachable power cords, some come with a power cord connected.

Next, the Capacitor Discharge gun is connected by Weld and Control Cables to the power unit. These hook-ups will provide signal to the unit from the gun and pass the weld charge during the actual weld cycle.

Each Capacitor Discharge stud welding system also has a Ground Cable, which is essential to “complete” the circuit for the weld cycle.

Finally, proper accessories are needed to prepare the gun for welding a specific type and size of fastener.

These components make up the “contact” capacitor discharge stud welding system as provided by all MIDWEST Fasteners CD portables.

Now, here’s a closer look at how to hook up a Capacitor Discharge stud welding unit.

Keep safety in mind in the operation of StudWelding and all types of power equipment. Always observe local and job-related safety practices, and keep in mind that this is electrical equipment capable of producing substantial power and voltages. Be sure to consult Manuals for your equipment and review trade-related guidelines for best practices under all conditions.

Connect the Ground Cable to the Unit, based on unit markings provided on the Control Unit.

Also, note here, some units have special “hook ups” for Ground connection based on the welding to be done, something like “CD” or “Cuphead”. If so, follow those markings.

You will also have a simple, single ground connection port.

Complete “grounding the work” by connecting the Ground Clamp to the metal to be welded. Make sure that this connection is tight and “clean” at all times.

Most stud welding is set up in “straight” polarity with the Ground “Positive” and the Gun providing the “Negative” pole for weld flow. Reverse polarity is also an available hook-up and can be used in some applications. Consult your References and Stud welding suppliers if you need to know more.

Next, the Gun is connected to the Power Unit by two cables:

  • a weld cable,
  • and a control line

Again, manufacturers provide markings to assist in helping to set up and connect properly. In each case, make sure the connections are sound and tight plus “locked” into place properly with their connector.

Finally make your power connection with the Power Cord.

Remember, easy hook up and portability allow you to “use” the CD system virtually anywhere, and only one-hundred-and-ten volt “everyday” electricity is needed.

Finally, select and properly install the right Accessories in, an on the CD gun. This is done based on the type and size of fasteners to be welded with the CD system. All connections here should be tight and complete; just as with the cable connections before.

With these simple steps completed, you can turn the Controller ON and your Capacitor Discharge system is ready-to-weld for stud, or pin, welding.

Simply:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • Weld

With that you have fast installation, reliable results, with a high quality weld.

A weld that is strong, even under substantial loads through a bond that is formed immediately, and that will fail in the fastener BEFORE it fails in the weld under tests.

Capacitor Discharge stud welding and Midwest Fasteners’ CD portable equipment is fast, reliable, and gives superior weld strength on many types of fasteners.

For more information on CD Stud Welding, please visit our industry leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

 

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What is Capacitor Discharge Stud Welding

Transcript:

At Midwest Fasteners, we know that saving time is crucial to all types of operations. Employing easy to use portable stud welding to install all types of fasteners can help get the job done, and Midwest Fasteners can help. Capacitor Discharge, often called “CD” welding for short, is characterized by the use of everyday power from an ordinary one-hundred-and-ten volt electrical outlet.

CD Welding is part of a larger family of fastening methods known as Stud Welding.

In addition to using readily-available electricity, CD Stud Welding Systems are:

  • very portable
  • feature simple, light-weight weld equipment,
  • work in short, low-temperature, weld cycles,
  • and can be used on sheet metal thickness material to create high strength welded fasteners in lots of varieties–all without the problems of burn-through or piercing the metal they are welded to

The Midwest Fasteners CD stud welder offers strength, speed and reliability from a simple process and weld system.

The Capacitor Discharge process occurs in 4 steps.

  • Contact
  • Ignition
  • Placement of the Stud (or ‘closing the Gap’)
  • and, Completion of the Weld Bond

For a closer look at the steps in C. D. stud welding, we’ll use a simple portable Midwest Fasteners Capacitor Discharge system.

First, the fastener is held by the Stud Gun allowing it to ‘contact’ the material.

Next, the CD gun is triggered passing the weld charge through the Gun, giving ignition of the stud at the stud tip.

As the “tip” melts, a small area of the material under the head of the Fastener also melts simultaneously. The CD gun forces the stud into the melted material, closing the space between fastener and material, and “landing” the fastener properly.

Finally, the stud is held in place as it instantly bonds together with the base material.

This is the “contact” capacitor discharge stud welding process as provided by all MIDWEST Fasteners CD portables. A closer look at the finished CD weld we’ve made shows the advantages of Capacitor Discharge stud welding.

Since easy hook-up and maximum portability allow you to “use it anywhere”, we only need one-hundred-and-ten volt readily-available electricity. With this the equipment produces low levels of heat, or “arc”, for the actual welding process.

Additionally, the finished weld shows NO backside burning or distortion. This provides many advantages, including a clean finish and clean appearance for an added benefit in many applications.

The weld bond is created in a short cycle, plus exhibits good strength in the actual studweld. In fact, upon destructive testing, it will fail in the thread without failing in the weld.

With that we have fast installation, reliable results and a high quality weld.

The Contact CD process can deliver 15-20 studwelds per minute.

While most actual manual operations will yield slower overall weld rates, these one-hundred-and-ten volt systems can weld as quickly as you:

  • Load
  • Contact
  • and Apply

Midwest Fasteners’ Capacitor Discharge stud welding is fast, reliable, and gives superior weld strength on many types of fasteners.

For more information on CD Stud Welding, go to the industry leading website at MidwestFasteners.com.

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USA TODAY Jobs Forecast article

So far this year, the United States has added roughly 1.6 million jobs. And in the 10 years through 2022, estimates have it that US employment will grow by over 15 million jobs, or by 11%.

Some jobs are expected to better capitalize on economic, demographic, and workplace trends than others.  The jobs with the largest expected growth are often those that benefit from America’s changing demographics.

Some of the fastest growing jobs are expected to receive a boost from economic trends. For example, construction laborers and helpers are expected to grow 25%, jobs such as masons’ helpers are expected to grow at a considerably higher rate of 45%.

To determine the jobs with the highest forecast rate of employment growth,  Projections were used to reference a specific job rather than a broader classification. Figures represent estimates from the BLS’ Occupational Outlook Handbook.

These are the fastest growing jobs in America:

  1. Industrial-Organizational Psychologists

> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 53.4%

  1. Personal Care Aides

> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 48.8%

  1. Home Health Aides

> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 48.5%

  1. Mechanical Insulation Workers

> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 46.7%

  1. Interpreters and Translators

> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 46.1%

 

 

24/7 Wall St. is a USA TODAY is a content partner offering financial news and commentary. For this summary, 24/7 analyzed Bureau of Labor Statistics for more than 1,000 job classifications.  24/7 Wall St. content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

 

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